Where’s Home, Daddy Bear?

Where’s Home, Daddy Bear?
Nicola Byrne
Walker Books

Evie Bear and her Dad are moving home and Evie feels full of doubts – ‘heavy’ in fact. “How will I make new friends?” she wants to know. She doesn’t understand why they need to move at all but eventually everything is loaded and it’s time to say goodbye to their city life and set off into the unknown.

As they drive further from everything familiar Evie’s worries continue. “Dad, what if I don’t like my new home?” she asks.
Where am I from now?” Evie wonders aloud when they stop for blueberry pancakes.

All the way Dad does his best to reassure the little bear with carefully considered words of comfort and activities to distract her from her worries.

When they stop for the night, tucked up together in a hammock they continue their discussion about home

and Dad tells his little Bear that he considers home is more about feelings and not really things at all.

After what seems like a very long drive next day, father and daughter finally reach their new abode

and as they start to unpack Evie comes to her own conclusion about what home means for her: no matter where they live, so long as her dad is with her, she will always feel at home.

Rich in detail both domestic and of the natural world, Nicola Byrne’s illustrations have plenty to pore over and enjoy, not least being the two tiny mice that move house along with the bears and appear in several scenes along the way with their suitcase. On the penultimate picture attentive readers will see them moving into a hole in the skirting board, a scene that also shows The Great Dragon Bake Off among Evie’s books.

The expressions on the bears’ faces say much about the loving bond between father and Evie and also about the emotional upheaval involved in their move.

Why this is happening, especially as their new home appears to be in the middle of nowhere, is left for audiences to ponder upon and draw their own conclusions as is the question of what has happened to Mother Bear; but then, gaps for the reader to fill are part and parcel of a good picture book.

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